White coal city : a memoir of place & family

2021, Book , xvi, 308 pages ;
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  3 copies

4060377
Summary/Review: "A moving, unflinching exploration of life in Prince Albert, on Treaty Six territory, as told through one family's multigenerational story. Robert Bos more...
Summary/Review: "A moving, unflinching exploration of life in Prince Albert, on Treaty Six territory, as told through one family's multigenerational story. Robert Boschman grew up in the living quarters of the King Koin Launderette in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, sandwiched between a residential school and a jail built in the aftermath of the Riel Resistance of 1885. White Coal City is the story of this hard, hockey-obsessed white-settler town on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River and Boschman's troubled family who navigated these lands. Trauma was palpable but never spoken of in the family, and this silence hounded the psychology of their men and boys. Years later, Boschman discovered the reason behind it: the devastating fate of his grandmother, killed by a hit-and-run driver while she was six months pregnant. Her husband, who saw it happen, was plagued by the crime. Their story is gently shared through letters, journal entries, newspaper clippings, and accounts from the coroner's inquest. With its penitentiary, sanatorium, pulp mill, and half-built hydroelectric dam, Boschman describes the city of Prince Albert as a "circle of pain"--one felt by white settlers but more so for the generations of First Nations and Métis people in the city and surrounding lands who were forcibly removed, incarcerated, or abducted. The harms of colonialism touched Boschman's family, and he accounts for his family's own part in Canada's shameful past. White Coal City is a poetic, necessary exploration of the painful landscapes of colonial cities in Canada."--
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