All the wrong moves : a memoir about chess, love, and ruining everything

2019, Book , 240 pages.
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28 holds /

 29 copies

3780248
Summary/Review: "This captivating, remarkable memoir, the story of a writer who travels the world for two years to pursue his dream of playing chess professionally, i more...
Summary/Review: "This captivating, remarkable memoir, the story of a writer who travels the world for two years to pursue his dream of playing chess professionally, is an exploration of love, talent, and human potential, by an exciting new non-fiction voice. If journalist and essayist Sasha Chapin could have chosen a different path in life he would have chosen chess genius. In All the Wrong Moves, he describes why he finds chess so enthralling. "Why nothing--not love, not amphetamines, not physical danger--makes my heart beat harder than the moment when I'm cornering an opponent's king," he writes. From childhood, when chess first became a refuge, through adolescence and his early twenties shaped by a struggle with bipolar disorder, chess, a "perfect information game," and its perfectly beautiful, knowable parameters, captivated him. When a reporting trip to Nepal and a casual game with a street hustler draw him back to the game a decade later, his passion for chess is rekindled, becoming an obsession and then a full-fledged addiction. Embarking on a globe-spanning journey, Chapin decides to pursue his passion to its limits, to see how far he can take it, risking his career, his relationship, and his sanity. In chess clubs, at tournaments, and in sidewalk games from Bangkok to Hyderabad and St. Louis to L.A., he uncovers a fascinating culture and precisely articulates the allure of a game played and loved by more than 600 million people. In between his own triumphant wins and spectacular losses, he trains with a grandmaster, delves into the story of famous "victims" of chess including Marcel Duchamp, examines whether our abilities are innate or changeable, and explores what happens when human potential collides with the limits of reality. In brilliant prose, with gems of sentences that pinpoint great truths about life, Chapin asks an important question: Should we live our lives in the service of what is comfortably attainable, or thrillingly impossible?"--
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