Statements

While most TPL branches share the same statement, those in Etobicoke and those along the Humber River have their own statements. Click on the map to see which statement belongs to your location.

Click on the map to see the statement for your location.

Location Statements

To find a full list of TPL branches, head over to our Locations page.

Etobicoke

These are the branches in Etobicoke:

Albion, Alderwood, Brentwood, Eatonville, Elmbrook Park, Humberwood, Long Branch, Mimico Centennial, Northern Elms, New Toronto, Richview, Rexdale

(Name of branch) is on Indigenous land. The Anishinaabemowin (Ah-nish-nah-be-mo-win) name for this area is Adobigok (ah-doh-bih-gok), which means the Place of the Alders.

This is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (ho-den-oh-sho-nee) Confederacy (aka. the Six Nations Confederacy), the Wendat, and the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. Toronto Public Library gratefully acknowledges these Indigenous nations for their guardianship of this land. We’d also like to remind and reaffirm, as Torontonians and Canadians, our accountability to these Indigenous nations, and to all Indigenous peoples and communities living in Toronto.

This land is also part of the Dish with One Spoon territory, a treaty between the Haudenosaunee Confederacy (aka. The Six Nations Confederacy), the Anishinaabek (Ah-nish-nah-bek) and allied nations, to peaceably share and care for this land, its waters, and all of the biodiversity in the Great Lakes region. All those who come to live and work here are responsible for honouring this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship, and respect.

Humber River

These are the branches along the Humber River:

Humber Bay, Humber Summit, Jane/Dundas, Mount Dennis, Swansea Memorial, Weston, Woodview Park

(Name of branch) is on Indigenous land and uniquely situated along Gabekanaang-ziibi (ka-be-ka-naang zee-bih), the Anishinaabemowin (Ah-nish-nah-be-mo-win) name for the Humber River, which means “Leave the canoes and go back.” This waterway provides an integral connection between Indigenous communities on the shore of Lake Ontario, Lake Simcoe, and the Georgian Bay region. The Anishinaabemowin (Ah-nish-nah-be-mo-win) name for this area is Adobigok (ah-doh-bih-gok), which means the Place of the Alders.

This is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (ho-den-oh-sho-nee) Confederacy (aka. Six Nations Confederacy), the Wendat, and the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. Toronto Public Library gratefully acknowledges these Indigenous nations for their guardianship of this land. We’d also like to remind and reaffirm, as Torontonians and Canadians, our accountability to these Indigenous nations, and to all Indigenous peoples and communities living in Toronto.

This land is also part of the Dish with One Spoon territory, a treaty between the Haudenosaunee Confederacy (aka. The Six Nations Confederacy), the Anishinaabek (Ah-nish-nah-bek) and allied nations, to peaceably share and care for this land, its waters, and all of the biodiversity in the Great Lakes region. All those who come to live and work here are responsible for honouring this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship, and respect.

Toronto

All other 81 branches not included in Etobicoke and Humber River

(Name of branch) is on Indigenous land. This is the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (ho-den-oh-sho-nee) Confederacy (aka. the Six Nations Confederacy), the Wendat, and the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. Toronto Public Library gratefully acknowledges these Indigenous nations for their guardianship of this land. We’d also like to remind and reaffirm, as Torontonians and Canadians, our accountability to these Indigenous nations, and to all Indigenous peoples and communities living in Toronto.

This land is also part of the Dish with One Spoon territory, a treaty between the Haudenosaunee Confederacy (aka. The Six Nations Confederacy), the Anishinaabek (Ah-nish-nah-bek) and allied nations, to peaceably share and care for this land, its waters, and all of the biodiversity in the Great Lakes region. All those who come to live and work here are responsible for honouring this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship, and respect.

Child-friendly statement

Haudenosaunee (ho-den-o-show-nee),
Mississauga and Anishinaabe (a-nish-nah-beh) Nations,
Came together with all their relations.
Living together, they had a united wish,
To share the land and waters in peace, like One Spoon with a Dish.
Now many Indigenous families, Métis and Inuit too,
Live here in treaty agreement, with me and you;
In the spirit of Peace, Friendship and mutual Respect,
We protect each other and the land, which we should never forget.

French statements

These are French statements (PDF 85kb) for all TPL branches.

Get in touch

If you have any questions or comments, please contact: indigenousinitiatives@torontopubliclibrary.ca

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