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History of Toronto Public Library

Date and Event

Elmsley House, home of the Toronto Library, 1810-1813 Elmsley House, home of the Toronto Library, 1810-1813

1810

The Toronto Library, a private subscription library, is founded, 9 December. During the American occupation of York in April 1813, the library was looted, but, in November 1813, Isaac Chauncey (the commander of the U.S. fleet) returned two cases of the library's books, with a note of apology to the trustees.

York Mechanics' Institute. This Institution was formed in the winter of 1831 by  the exertions of a few public-spirited individuals. Its views at present are confined to two objects, viz. The acquisition  of valuable and extensive Library and the diffusion of useful knowledge by means of Lectures and experiments. The  government of this Institution is vested in a President, five Vice-Presidents, two Secretaries, and twelve Managers. Their  Names at Present Are, Hon. John Henry Dunn, Patron. Doctor W. W. Baldwin, President. Doctor Rolph, Dr. Dunlop B Jarvis,  Esq. M.P., John Ewart Esq. James Lesslie and Timothy Parson, Secretaries. Committee. Messrs: Thos. Carafrae, Jun., J. W.  Brent, J, Durward, Wm. Musson, James Worts, John Murchison, Charles Stotesbury, David Paterson, Rev. A. Steward, Alexander  Thompson, Thomas Armstrong, Alexander Stewart. The Meetings are held (by permission of the Sheriff) in the Grand Jury-room.  The library is kept at Mr. Timothy Parson's 215 King street. The Annual subscription is 5s. York Mechanics' Institute notice in the York Commercial Directory, 1833

1830

York Mechanics' Institute is established "for the mutual improvement of its members in useful scientific knowledge... A library of reference and circulation will be formed."

Toronto Mechanics' Institute diploma, designed by Sandford Fleming, 1850. Toronto Mechanics' Institute diploma, designed by Sandford Fleming, 1850

1834

Town of York becomes the City of Toronto, and the York Mechanics' Institute is renamed Toronto Mechanics' Institute. To educate workers (mechanics), the Institute provided a library and offered classes ranging from philosophy and music to science, electricity and architectural drawing.

1834

Scarboro' Subscription Library is established.

Toronto Mechanics' Institute,  Court Street Firehall, 1860. Toronto Mechanics' Institute, Court Street Firehall, 1860

1845

Toronto Mechanics' Institute relocates its library and news-room to the upper floor of the new Central Fire Hall (behind the County Court House) on the north side of Court-house lane (now Court Street), west of Church Street between King and Adelaide streets.

Weston Town Hall, 1955, location of the Weston Mechanics' Institute (later  Weston Public Library), 1885-1914. Weston Town Hall, 1955, location of the Weston Mechanics' Institute (later Weston Public Library), 1885-1914

1858

Weston Mechanics' Institute is established.

1861

Toronto Mechanics' Institute moves into its new home at the northeast corner of Church and Adelaide streets. Designed by F. W. Cumberland & G. W. Storm, the building contains a library with a separate reading room, a lecture hall and a large music hall.

Campbell Block, location of West Toronto Junction Mechanics' Institute, 1889-93. Campbell Block, location of West Toronto Junction Mechanics' Institute, 1889-93

1870s and 1880s

Mechanics' institutes with lending libraries and reading rooms are incorporated at Scarboro' (1878), Parkdale (1880) and West Toronto Junction (1888); and revitalized and reorganized at Weston (1885).

Card reading Vote for a Free Library Campaign card for the free public library, c.1882

1882

Free Libraries Act is passed by the Ontario Legislature. Alderman John Hallam leads the Toronto campaign to establish a free public library in Toronto.

John Hallam (1883-1900), first chairman of the Toronto Public Library Board, 1883 John Hallam (1883-1900), first chairman of the Toronto Public Library Board, 1883

1883

Free Library By-Law is approved by a huge majority of Toronto voters, Jan. 1. Toronto and Guelph are the first municipalities in Ontario to create free public libraries. John Hallam becomes the first chairman of the Toronto Public Library Board.

Invitation to the opening of Toronto Public Library, March 6, 1884. Invitation to the opening of Toronto Public Library, March 6, 1884

1884

Toronto Public Library officially opens in the old Mechanics' Institute building, Church and Adelaide streets, on 6 March – the city's 50th anniversary.

Invitation to the opening of Toronto Public Library, March 6, 1884. Northern Branch, St. Paul's Hall (formerly Yorkville Town Hall), Yonge Street, west side, looking west on Collier Street, 1907.

1884

Toronto Public Library opens its first two branches, Northern and Western, followed in 1888 with another pair, North Western and Eastern, all housed in rented quarters.

1885

Books in German and French are bought, the beginnings of the library's multi-language collections. Literature in Spanish and Italian is added by 1900, and, to meet the needs of recent immigrants, books in several other European languages are added in the 1910s. Cataloguing Department Head Winifred Barnstead reports in 1916: "By the purchase of a Hammond typewriter we were able to type and place in the College Street Branch special catalogues in the Modern Greek, Yiddish and Russian scripts."

James Bain Jr. (1842-1908), first chief librarian, 1883-1908. James Bain Jr. (1842-1908), first chief librarian, 1883-1908

1887

Policy to collect Canadiana is established. James Bain Jr., the first chief librarian, begins building the library's special collections of publications and manuscripts documenting Canada.

Don Public Library in  Aggie Hogg's store, 1925. Don Public Library in Aggie Hogg's store, 1925

1890s

Mechanics' institutes, renamed public libraries on 1 May 1895, are formed at Highland Creek (1890) Islington (1890), Don (1896) and Bracondale (1898).

1890

Toronto Public Library opens Dundas Street Branch in January 1890 in rented quarters on today's Ossington Avenue north of Queen Street, using furniture and books transferred from the former Parkdale Mechanics' Institute library, annexed to Toronto in 1889.

Scarborough  Centennial Memorial Library committee, 1896 Scarborough Centennial Memorial Library committee, 1896

1896

Scarborough Centennial Memorial Library is built as part of the township's 100th anniversary celebrations.

Runnymede Public Library, York Township, about 1912

1900s

Public libraries are established at East Toronto (1903), Deer Park (1905), North Toronto (1909) and Runnymede (1909). Toronto Public Library opens College Street Branch in rented quarters at the corner of Brunswick Avenue.

Andrew Carnegie 2 east 91sth street new york 23rd January, 1903 jas. Bain, esq.  chief librarian, Toronto ont Canada dear sir Mr. Carnegie has read your letter of 20th January and asks me to say that he  will take pleasure in giving three hundred and fifty thousand dollars for a new central library building and three branch  library buildings for Toronto the latter to cost seventy-five thousand dollars. This conditioned upon Toronto guaranteeing  by resolution of councils to support the libraries at cost of not less than thirty-five thousand dollars per year, and to  give suitable sites for the buildings respectfully yours p. secretary Letter offering Carnegie grant, January 23, 1903

1903

Toronto is awarded a Carnegie grant of $350,000 for a new central library (Opened in 1909) and three branches: Yorkville (1907), Queen & Lisgar (1909-1964), and Riverdale (1910).

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries

1909

Toronto Reference Library is opened at the northwest corner of College and St. George streets with 97,788 books.

Western Branch, Annette and Medland streets, about 1910 Western Branch, Annette and Medland streets, about 1910

1909

Western (now Annette Street) Branch opens. It was built with a $20,000 Carnegie grant to the old City of West Toronto, amalgamated with Toronto in May 1909.

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries -Western (Annette Street)

Toronto public library open access shelves circulating libraries church  collegeyorkville queen and lisgar riverdale western and deer park the difficulties of administration are multiplied under  this system and on behalf of the assistant librarians I ask the public to cooperate in helping to keep the shelves in an  orderly condition. This is asked in the interests of the borrowers who are daily complaining of the condition of our  shelves. When a borrower is careless in handling books and neglects to put them on the shelves in an upright condition, he  is handicapping his neighbour who is equally interested with him in looking for suitable literature. There was an  impression among unthinking individuals that the books in a public library belong to some body that has only a corporate  existence and hence carelessness in handling the property was not accounted disgraceful. It is interesting to notice that a  better public spirit is being aroused and, indeed, is going so far, that reports from borrowers are being sent to the chief  librarian informing him as to certain more or less flagrant offenders. This means that your neighbour is interested in the  manner in which you handle the property in which he has a share. This is the library of the people of Toronto, and the  position of the public library board is to see that the administration in the interests of all people is not endangered by  selfishness or carelessness of a few individuals. The chief librarian is always ready to receive any written and signed  suggestions by the adoption of which any citizen may think the libraries will be made more efficient. George h. locke,  chief librarian Notice about open access shelves, 1909

1909

Open shelf system is adopted allowing borrowers in the branches to retrieve books themselves instead of asking library staff.

Children's Room, College Street Branch, about 1911. Children's Room, College Street Branch, about 1911

1909

College Street Branch, previously housed in rented quarters at the corner of Brunswick Avenue, is relocated to the basement of the new Reference Library; it includes a Children's Room.

Earlscourt Branch, 1913 Earlscourt Branch, 1913

1910

Toronto Public Library opens branches in storefronts and other rented premises to serve areas recently annexed to Toronto until permanent libraries can be built: Deer Park and Wychwood in 1911; Northern and Earlscourt in 1913, and Beaches and Eastern in 1914. Prior to annexation, some of these areas had their own public libraries.

1911

Municipal Reference Library opens in Toronto City Hall. This is the start of special services for civic officials and business people.

1911

John Ross Robertson with his collection at the Toronto Reference Library,  about 1912. John Ross Robertson with his collection at the Toronto Reference Library, about 1912

John Ross Robertson Historical Collection is presented to the Toronto Public Library.

1912

Dewey Decimal system of classification is adopted for all books except fiction. Toronto Public Library's Cataloguing Department prepares An Extension of the Dewey Decimal Classification applied to Canada.

Lillian H. Smith (1887-1983), about 1925. Lillian H. Smith (1887-1983), about 1925

1912

Lillian H. Smith is hired to head Toronto Public Library's new Children's Department, and inaugurates story hours and other innovative services for children.

Dovercourt (now Bloor/Gladstone) Branch, rendering about 1912. Dovercourt (now Bloor/Gladstone) Branch, rendering about 1912

1913

Dovercourt (now Bloor/Gladstone) Branch opens. It is the first library to be financed fully by the City of Toronto.

Mimico Public Library sketch, 1914. Mimico Public Library sketch, 1914

1913

Mimico Public Library Board is established, opening a Carnegie-funded library in the village in 1915.

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries -Mimico

Weston Public Library, about 1915 Weston Public Library, about 1915

1914

Weston Public Library Board, established in 1912, opens a Carnegie-funded library in the town.

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries -Weston

1915

A camp library is established at Exhibition Park for troops training to serve in the First World War. Toronto Public Library is the first library in North America to provide this service for soldiers.

1916

Three identical branches, Beaches, High Park and Wychwood, open. They were built with a $50,000 grant to Toronto Public Library in 1908.

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries -Beaches

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries -High Park

Toronto's Carnegie Libraries - Wychwood

Agincourt Association Library, about 1925 Agincourt Association Library, about 1925

1918

Library associations are formed at Agincourt, followed by Swansea (1919), established "as a Memorial to our Swansea men who have seen active service in the Great War."

Library at University Settlement House, 1920s Library at University Settlement House, 1920s

1918

To provide extra service for inner city children, Toronto Public Library opens a library in Central Neighbourhood House. Children's libraries soon are started at other settlement houses: St. Christopher House in 1920, University Settlement House in 1921 and Memorial Institute in 1931.

Danforth (now Pape/Danforth) Branch, rendering about 1928. Danforth (now Pape/Danforth) Branch, rendering about 1928

1920s

Six new branch libraries open in Toronto: Earlscourt (1921, now Dufferin/St. Clair), Eastern (1921, now Main Street), Northern (1923-1975, later St. Clement's), Gerrard (1924, now Gerrard/Ashdale), Downtown (1927-1965), and Danforth (1929, now Pape/Danforth).

Birch Cliff Library, 1939. Birch Cliff Library, 1939

1920s

Association libraries also are organized at Birch Cliff (1920), New Toronto (1921), Scarboro Bluffs (1922) Long Branch (1923) and Humber Bay (1925).

1922

Boys and Girls House opens on St. George Street. It is the first library devoted exclusively to children in the British Empire.

New Toronto Public Library, about 1954 New Toronto Public Library, about 1954

1923

The assocation library at New Toronto transfers its assets to the newly-created free public library board, which opens a new library building in 1928.

1923

Canadian Catalogue of Books is started, an annual list of "books published in Canada about Canada, as well as those written by Canadians." Toronto Public Library continues to prepare and publish this forerunner of Canada's official national bibliography for 28 annual instalments. The National Library of Canada takes over the project in 1951, renaming the bibliography, Canadiana.

George H. Locke (1870-1937), chief librarian 1908-1937. George H. Locke (1870-1937), chief librarian 1908-1937

1927

Chief librarian George H. Locke is the first Canadian to be president of the American Library Association, 1926-27. During his presidency, the American Library Association held its annual meeting in Toronto, June 1927.

1928

A free public library is organized in York Township School Section 28, Mount Dennis.

1930s

A public library association is organized in Oakwood (1933), which never operates, and association libraries close at Don, Islington, Long Branch, Runnymede, and Scarborough Bluffs, followed by Birch Cliff in 1944.

1930

Central Circulating Library is added to the Reference Library.

Sunnybrook Hospital Reading Room, 1948 Sunnybrook Hospital Reading Room, 1948

1930

Toronto Public Library extends service to Thistletown Hospital for Sick Children, the start of its extension work to hospitals, old age homes and other institutions.

Runnymede Branch, rendering 1929 Runnymede Branch, rendering 1929

1930

Runnymede Branch opens.

Military Camp Library, 1939 Military Camp Library, 1939

1939

Military Camp Library is established at Exhibition Place for the troops in training there.

First Leaside Public Library, 645 Bayview Avenue, 1945 First Leaside Public Library, 645 Bayview Avenue, 1945

1943

An association public library is organized in Leaside, and opens a library in rented quarters at 645 (now 1645) Bayview Avenue. The Leaside Public Library Board, formed in 1944, opens a library at 165 McRae Drive in 1950.

Charles R. Sanderson, TPL chief librarian, at the opening of East York  children's libraries, 1945. Charles R. Sanderson, TPL chief librarian, at the opening of East York children's libraries, 1945.

1944

A children's library opens in R. H. McGregor School, East York on 7 November 1944. The Township of East York Public Library Board is established in 1946, opening a library at the northeast corner of Coxwell and Mortimer avenues in 1950.

York Township bookmobile, about  1948. York Township bookmobile, about 1948

1945

Township of York Public Library Board is formed, taking over the assets of the Mount Dennis Library, which operated a small branch in rented quarters above a store.

In 1948, it begins the first bookmobile service in Toronto area. A Main Library on Eglinton, and two new branches, Jane Street and Mount Dennis, open in 1951.

Long Branch Library opening, 8 June 1955. Long Branch Library opening, 8 June 1955

1946

Long Branch Public Library Board holds its first meeting on 22 January. In 1955, it opens its own library building on Lake Shore Boulevard.

Edgar Osborne and he Osborne Collection of Early Children's Books Edgar Osborne and he Osborne Collection of Early Children's Books

1949

The Osborne Collection of Early Children's Books is presented to the Toronto Public Library Board by Edgar Osborne; the collection represents English children's literature from the 14th century up to 1910.

George H. Locke Memorial Branch, 1949 George H. Locke Memorial Branch, 1949

1949

George H. Locke Memorial Branch opens, TPL's first new branch since the Depression and the Second World War. It is named for Toronto Public Library's chief librarian, 1908-1937.

More about George H. Locke

1950s

Two new branch buildings open in Toronto: Deer Park (1952) and Parliament Street (1955).

Etobicoke Public Library bookmobile, about 1953. Etobicoke Public Library bookmobile, about 1953

1950

Township of Etobicoke Public Library Board is established. During the 1950s, when Etobicoke's population tripled, branch libraries are opened at Humber Bay (1951), Brentwood (1955) Alderwood (1958) and Rexdale (1959), while a bookmobile serves many neighbourhoods.

North York Memorial Hall, 1956. North York Memorial Hall, 1956

1950

North York Public Library opens on the ground floor of the new North York Memorial Community Hall, Yonge Street, south of Park Home Avenue. By 1997 it has grown into a system of 19 library locations, providing a tiered model of service with a central library, and regional and satellite branches.

Construction of new Forest Hill Village Library and Municipal Building, 1962. Construction of new Forest Hill Village Library and Municipal Building, 1962

1954

Forest Hill Public Library Board is established, with assets transferred from an earlier association library. A new library opens in the village's municipal building built in 1962.

Scarborough Public Library bookmobile, 1956 Scarborough Public Library bookmobile, 1956

1955

Scarborough Public Library Board is established, bringing together the Agincourt, Highland Creek and Scarboro library associations, and opening the Golden Mile Branch in 1956. By 1997, it has developed into a system of 19 libraries including neighbourhood and community branches, and three district libraries.

Don Mills Branch, North York Public Library, about 1961. Don Mills Branch, North York Public Library, about 1961

1960s

Twenty-four new libraries open in Metropolitan Toronto: Jones (1962), Parkdale (1964), City Hall (1965) and Charles R. Sanderson (1968, named for the chief librarian, 1937-1956) in Toronto; Eatonville (1964) and Albion Mall (1965) in Etobicoke; Evelyn Gregory (1968) in York; McGregor Park (1960), Bendale (1961) Taylor Memorial (1962), Cedarbrae (1965) Morningside (1968) in Scarborough; S. Walter Stewart (1960) and Todmorden (1961) in East York; Don Mills (1961), Bathurst Heights (1962), Downsview (1963), Woodview Park (1964), Bayview (1966) Centennial (1966), Amesbury Park (1967), Victoria Village (1967), Black Creek (1968) and Brookbanks (1968) in North York. In addition, the old Carnegie library at Mimico is replaced with the Mimico Centennial Library.

City Hall Branch, 1965 City Hall Branch, 1965

1965

City Hall Branch opens in Toronto's new city hall. As well as a circulating library it houses a business and municipal reference collections.

TPL logo TPL logo

1967

Public library boards at Forest Hill (est. 1954) and Swansea (est. 1923) are amalgamated with Toronto Public Library Board, when their municipalities became part of the City of Toronto.

East York Public Library logo East York Public Library logo

1967

Township of East York and the Town of Leaside are amalgamated to form the Borough of East York. The East York Public Library Board is established, amalgamating the public library boards of the former Township of East York (est. 1946) and the Town of Leaside (est. 1944). By 1997 it had five branch locations.

York Public Library logo York Public Library logo

1967

Borough of York Public Library is formed bringing together library facilities from York Township and the Town of Weston; by 1997 it had six branch libraries.

Etobicoke Public Library logo Etobicoke Public Library logo

1967

With the amalgamation of the Township of Etobicoke with the towns of Mimico, New Toronto, and Long Branch, the Etobicoke Public Library Board is formed. Its ten branch locations increase to 13 by 1997.

Metropolitan Toronto Library Board Logo, 1987 Metropolitan Toronto Library Board Logo, 1987

1967

Metropolitan Toronto Library Board is established. The Central Library collections and other special collections were transferred from the Toronto Public Library to the new Metro Board.

Fairview Branch, 1976 Fairview Branch, 1976

1970s

Eighteen new branches are opened in Metropolitan Toronto: Palmerston (1971), Northern District (1975), Spadina Road (1977), Perth/Dupont (1977) and Queen/Saulter (1979) in Toronto; Albert Campbell (1971), Cliffcrest (1972), Guildwood (1974), Port Union (1974), Bridlewood (1976) and Woodside Square (1977) in Scarborough; Thorncliffe Park (1970) in East York; York Woods (1970), Fairview (1972), Humber Summit (1974), Hillcrest (1975), Pleasant View (1975), and Flemington Park (1978) in North York.

Book from the Merril Collection Book from the Merril Collection

1970

Judith Merril donates her collection to the Toronto Public Library, the beginning of the Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation and Fantasy.

Shut-in Service is inaugurated at Toronto Public Library, and in Etobicoke in 1971.

Toronto Reference Library, 1977 Toronto Reference Library, 1977

1977

New Metropolitan Toronto Library opens at 789 Yonge Street at Asquith Avenue.

St. Clair/Silverthorn Branch, 1981 St. Clair/Silverthorn Branch, 1981

1980s

Eleven new branches are opened in Metropolitan Toronto: St. Clair/Silverthorn (1981), St. Lawrence (1982), College/Shaw (1984) and Danforth/Coxwell (1989) in Toronto; Malvern (1982), Maryvale (1982), Steeles (1987) and Kennedy/Eglinton (1988) in Scarborough; Armour Heights (1982) and Jane Sheppard (1989) in North York; and Elmbrook Park (1988) in Etobicoke. In addition, North York Central Library opens in a new facility in 1985.

Oakwood Village Branch, 1997 Oakwood Village Branch, 1997

1990s

Four new branches are opened in Metropolitan Toronto before amalgamation: Goldhawk Park (1992) in Scarborough; Northern Elms (1991) and Humberwood (1996) in Etobicoke; and Oakwood Village (1997) in York. In addition, several branches are replaced or renovated.

1997

The City of Toronto Act (Bill 103) is passed by the Ontario Legislature, amalgamating the seven exisiting municipal governments of Metropolitan Toronto.

Toronto Public Library logo Toronto Public Library logo

1998

Seven library boards in Metropolitan Toronto are united into one library called the Toronto Public Library. With 98 locations, it is the largest public library system in North America serving a population of 2.3 million.

Josephine Bryant is appointed as the first City Librarian of the newly-amalamaged Toronto Public Library.

Burrows Hall is the first branch opened by the new Toronto Public Library Board.

Virtual Reference Library Virtual Reference Library

1999

Integrated online catalogue of the Library's collections is completed, giving unified access to nine million books, magazines, CDs, CD-ROMs and other materials in a hundred different languages.

Virtual Reference Library is launched, providing Internet access to information on key subject areas through a series of gateways, digitized collections and research databases.

Computer Learning Centre, Riverdale Branch, 1997 Computer Learning Centre, Riverdale Branch, 1997

2000

Installation of more than 400 Internet workstations acquired through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

2000

First strategic plan of the amalgamated Toronto Public Library is prepared to guide the library into the new millennium.

Historicity Toronto Then and Now Historicity Toronto Then and Now

2001

Toronto Public Library becomes the world's second most used public library by circulation after Hong Kong.

Launch of Historicity: Toronto Then and Now, an award-winning Internet gateway to the history of Toronto and its neighbourhoods.

Leaside Branch rendering, 2000 Leaside Branch rendering, 2000

2002

Leaside Branch, officially re-opened on June 11, 2002, replaces the old Leaside Branch (1950).

ALA Toronto Logo ALA Toronto Logo

2003

Toronto Public Library hosts the American Library Association Conference, June 19-25.

2004

Toronto Public Library launches its second strategic plan for 2004-2007: Urban Stories: The Next Chapter.

St. James Town Branch, 2004 St. James Town Branch, 2004

2004

St. James Town, Toronto Public Library's 99th branch, opens October 14.

Beaches Branch renovation, 2005 Beaches Branch renovation, 2005

2005

Beaches (January 20), Malvern (January 28), Northern Elms (April 16), Runnymede (June 8) and Long Branch (September 27) all officially reopen after extensive renovations.

Pape/Danforth Branch renovation, 2006 Pape/Danforth Branch renovation, 2006

2006

Morningside Branch reopens (May 30), after relocation and reconstruction.

Pape/Danforth Branch reopens (August 29) after a major renovation.

A site is acquired for Toronto Public Library's 100th Branch at Bathurst Street and Fort York Blvd. Project is expected to commence in 2008.

Woodside Square Branch, 2007

2007

Woodside Square Branch reopens after relocation and expansion (April 30).

Yorkville Branch, Toronto Public Library's oldest building, celebrates 100 years of service. (June 16).

Jane Pyper, appointed new City Librarian, 2008 Jane Pyper, appointed new City Librarian, 2008

2008

Three branches reopen after major renovations: Jane/Dundas (February 4), S. Walter Stewart (May 28) and Dufferin/St.Clair (October 28), and Cliffcrest Branch reopens after a relocation and an expansion. (April 3).

Josephine Bryant announces her early retirement (February 21) and Jane Pyper is appointed as the new City Librarian (September 2).

Toronto Public Library publishes its third strategic plan since city amalgamation for 2008-2011, Our Shared Stories.

Jane Sheppard Rendering

2009

Jane/Sheppard Branch closes for relocation (January 31) and reopens in new location (April 2).

Two branches reopen after major renovations and expansions: Kennedy/Eglinton (June 25) and Bloor/Gladstone (July 23).

Toronto Public Library Foundation launches a five-year, $34 million revitalization of the Toronto Reference Library.

The Bram and Bluma Appel Salon is opened in Toronto Reference Library (Sep 17).

Annette Street Branch celebrates 100 years of service in the Carnegie building. (Sep 12).

Cedarbrae Library, 2010 Cedarbrae Branch, 2010

2010

Public consultation begins for a new library branch, Scarborough Centre (Feb 17).

Two branches reopen after major renovations and expansions: Thorncliffe (Apr 13) and Cedarbrae (Dec 6).

Brentwood Branch closes for a major renovation & expansion (Sep 25).

Riverdale Branch celebrates 100 years of service (Oct 2).

Rendering Fort York Fort York/Bathurst, Rendering

2011

Public consultation begins for a new library branch, Fort York/Bathurst (May 10).

Urban Affairs collections and services are relocated to the Toronto Reference Library (Sep 15) and a new glass entrance cube opens as part of a 5-year $34 million revitalization of the Toronto Reference Library (Dec 24).

Photograph of Brentwood Brentwood Branch, 2012

2012

Brentwood Branch reopens after a major renovation. (Nov 2)

Fairview Branch closes for a renovation. (Oct 6)

photograph of Mount Dennis at Dusk Mount Dennis Branch, 2013

2013

Mount Dennis Branch reopens after a major renovation. (Mar 11)

Public meetings are held to begin to plan the major renovation of Albion Branch, the exterior renovation of Northern District Branch and the relocation of Bayview Branch.